Universal Basic Income

I wrote in a previous post that Coronavirus will teach us many lessons and new ways of interacting and being in the world. I think a huge change that will come as a result (even after the virus dies down) will be Universal Basic Income. Perhaps not this (2020) election cycle, but I imagine a good chance in the next cycle.

I gave a project in one of my math classes that asked students to search for a home and calculate mortgage payments etc. I always try to give students some real world use for the math they are learning. Even though they all sigh when I say “math is beautiful”. Anyways, I linked for them to use Redfin to search up their homes. I (naively) assumed that Redfin was everywhere. It is decidedly not. My wife and I bought our house using Redfin and it was very easy, and from what we could tell, very “user-friendly”. But many parts of the country that are less economically well off haven’t even benefitted from this new technology. Long story short, I began looking for the reasons behind this technology gap. It couldn’t just be race, it was very clearly socio-economic.

I say that to say, I then stumbled upon “The War on Normal People” by Andrew Yang. A fantastic book! In the book he talks about how our changing economy (especially after the Great Recession) has pooled resources among smaller and smaller groups of people. Many Americans are simply being left behind. Yang says that automation will eventually put large groups of people out of work. His solution is Universal Basic Income. I immediately followed his every move starting in mid-2019 until he eventually dropped out of the Democratic Presidential race in February 2020. He did very well for a “nobody” competing among much better resourced and connected candidates.

In comes Coronavirus. Even conservative estimates predict up to 30% unemployment as a result. People who are hard-working simply can’t work. It’s not their fault. They aren’t lazy, they didn’t do anything wrong, they were just blind-sided. It necessitates a change in thinking. If people who are willing and able to work can’t, should we deny them human decency? Would we rather spend our money on at least a certain percentage of lazy people on welfare? Or would we choose to give money to people as an investment, knowing that most hard-working people will immediately invest that money back in their communities? Most people won’t buy drugs or alcohol with it. They’ll get tutoring for their kids, get their car fixed, go back to school, or stay at home and raise children. So we see the first glimpse of a universal income from the Trump presidency?!?! Interestingly enough, living in the cultural “progressive” bubble that is the DC area, I find that many “democrats” are surprisingly close-minded about UBI whereas many more conservatives can see the value. Talk about irony.

My prediction is that Universal Basic Income will become a reality for all Americans within the next 10-15 years, likely sooner rather than later. What do you think? Thanks for reading.

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