Advice for Times of Stagnation

Life presents us with many challenges. Some of them are of our own making, and some of them we have nothing to do with. We all feel at times we should give up. We think we should stop following our better eating patterns, slack off in our work, or stop saving money. Most advice about why you should keep going even in the face of setbacks is sentimental rather than logical. Meaning, once the feeling of motivation runs out, we have a good excuse to quit. There are, however, logical reasons that we can remind ourselves of that can keep us working toward our goals. Effective advice for times of stagnation can help us remember underlying principles and stay the course.

Changes can Happen at the Micro-level

When we embark on a new journey, we actually begin to change for the better the instant we decide to do something. Whether we know it or not, connections are being made in our brains to aid us in achieving our goal. That being said, visible and measurable changes take time to come about. A person who begins working out doesn’t see results after the first week, or even the first month. But sure enough, if they keep at it they can see results after three months and even a new physique after a year (working consistently).

This is because change happens continuously, but some changes are so small they cannot be seen or detected yet. They are certainly taking place, we just can’t see the results. It may seem like the progress has stalled, but micro-improvements are still being made. Plateaus are not indefinite, but rather temporary (seeming) stagnation before the next level. When you want to give up, remind yourself that change is happening, you probably just can’t see the results yet. Telling yourself this can help you keep going, even when things look like they have stalled.

Advice for Times of Stagnation: Growth is non-linear

When we think of growth or achieving a goal, we usually think linearly. remember Algebra class? Linear means a consistent rate of change. Many natural processes are more cyclical or seasonal. For example, a child can expect to have a number of “growth spurts” as they reach full development. No parent says “Darn he stopped growing for a week, guess they’ll be this small forever…”. We know (and accept…this is important), that growth doesn’t happen on a particular schedule, but rather cyclically, and often sporadically. When we feel discouraged we can remind ourselves that perhaps every season is not a season of growth. And that’s okay. This can help us keep going because we know that consistent action will reap rewards, even when we don’t see them yet.

The path to any meaningful achievement is seldom linear. There are times of stagnation, slowed growth, and perhaps even regression. If we can remember that this is all part of the process, it makes the pill a little easier to swallow. Thanks for reading!

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